Human Rights

Global and regional estimates of violence against women: Prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence (WHO)

Report & Infographics in English: http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/violence/9789241564625/en/index.html

Summary in French: http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/violence/9789241564625/fr/index.html

Summary in Spanish: http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/violence/9789241564625/es/index.html

Physical or sexual violence is a public health problem that affects more than one third of all women globally, according to a new report released on 20 June 2013 by the World Health Organization (WHO) in partnership with the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the South African Medical Research Council. The report represents the first systematic study of global data on the prevalence of violence against women – both by partners and non-partners. Some 35% of all women will experience either intimate partner or non-partner violence. The study finds that intimate partner violence is the most common type of violence against women, affecting 30% of women worldwide. The study highlights the need for all sectors to engage in eliminating tolerance for violence against women and better support for women who experience it. New WHO guidelines, launched with the report, aim to help countries improve their health sector’s capacity to respond to violence against women.

 Human Rights Indicators: A Guide to Measurement and Implementation

English & Spanish: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Indicators/Pages/HRIndicatorsIndex.aspx

human rightsThe publication aims to assist in developing quantitative and qualitative indicators to measure progress in the implementation of international human rights norms and principles. The Guide describes the conceptual and methodological framework for human rights indicators recommended by international and national human rights mechanisms and used by a growing number of governmental and non-governmental actors. It provides concrete examples of indicators identified for a number of human rights—all originating from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights—and other practical tools and illustrations, to support the realization of human rights at all levels. The Guide will be of interest to human rights advocates as well as policymakers, development practitioners, statisticians and others who are working to make human rights a reality for all.

 

Regional study: management of the external borders of the European Union and its impact on the human rights of migrants (Report of the Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants, François Crépeau, A/HRC/23/46)

English, French & Spanish: http://undocs.org/A/HRC/23/46

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants, François Crépeau, warned on 29 May 2013 that the increasing competence of the European Union in the field of migration has not always been accompanied by a corresponding guarantee of rights for migrants themselves, and in particular irregular migrants. “Within EU institutional and policy structures, migration and border control have been increasingly integrated into security frameworks that emphasize policing, defence and criminality over a rights-based approach,” Mr. Crépeau said during the presentation of his special report* on EU border management to the UN Human Rights Council. Since May 2012, the Special Rapporteur undertook a one-year comprehensive study to examine the rights of migrants in the Euro-Mediterranean region, focusing in particular on the management of the external borders of the European Union. Starting with a visit to the EU authorities in Brussels, Mr. Crépeau also carried out information-gathering missions to two key transit countries, Turkey and Tunisia, and two of the main entry points into the EU, Greece and Italy.

Further information: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Migration/SRMigrants/Pages/SRMigrantsIndex.aspx

 

Global and regional estimates of violence against women: Prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence (WHO)

Report & Infographics in English: http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/violence/9789241564625/en/index.html

Summary in French: http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/violence/9789241564625/fr/index.html

Summary in Spanish: http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/violence/9789241564625/es/index.html

Physical or sexual violence is a public health problem that affects more than one third of all women globally, according to a new report released on 20 June 2013 by the World Health Organization (WHO) in partnership with the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the South African Medical Research Council. The report represents the first systematic study of global data on the prevalence of violence against women – both by partners and non-partners. Some 35% of all women will experience either intimate partner or non-partner violence. The study finds that intimate partner violence is the most common type of violence against women, affecting 30% of women worldwide. The study highlights the need for all sectors to engage in eliminating tolerance for violence against women and better support for women who experience it. New WHO guidelines, launched with the report, aim to help countries improve their health sector’s capacity to respond to violence against women.